Providing A Wheelchair As Part Of Our Response to the Unmet Humanitarian Needs of The Most Vulnerable Conflict-Affected Populations in Mindanao (REACH) Project

7-year-old Abdul Khalid was a healthy baby boy when he was born but when he turned one, his mother, Salma, noticed that his legs started becoming weaker and thinner. Since then, Abdul Khalid’s parents have been preoccupied with attending to his special needs.

Because of his condition, he needs to be carried most of the time which limits his parents’ daily activities and sometimes holds them back in doing farm activities and other livelihood opportunities.

Last December 8, 2020, Abdul Khalid was one of the selected beneficiaries for the health mission conducted at Saguiaran Multipurpose Hall in Saguiran, Lanao del Sur. The activity was facilitated by Action Against Hunger together with the municipal health officer (MHO) and staff of the regional health unit (RHU).

Through the health mission, Abdul Khalid was granted with a wheelchair which was delivered on February 23, 2021 with the support and coordination of the MHO and the local government unit’s focal for health.

Upon receiving the wheelchair, Abdul Khalid’s father, Malic, expressed his gratitude for the health assistance. Because they no longer have to carry their son all the time, this will be a big help in carrying out their daily activities more efficiently, thus giving Salma and Malic more time to focus on their livelihoods and at the same time improving their son’s quality of life.

This health & protection intervention is part of our 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗽𝗼𝗻𝘀𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗨𝗻𝗺𝗲𝘁 𝗛𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗶𝘁𝗮𝗿𝗶𝗮𝗻 𝗡𝗲𝗲𝗱𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗠𝗼𝘀𝘁 𝗩𝘂𝗹𝗻𝗲𝗿𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲 𝗖𝗼𝗻𝗳𝗹𝗶𝗰𝘁-𝗔𝗳𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗣𝗼𝗽𝘂𝗹𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝗠𝗶𝗻𝗱𝗮𝗻𝗮𝗼 (𝗥𝗘𝗔𝗖𝗛). The project is funded by the EU Civil Protection & Humanitarian Aid – ECHO and is implemented together with CARE PhilippinesOxfam Pilipinas, and their local partners.

(Photo by Jonairah Alingan for Action Against Hunger)

In Celebration of International Women’s Day, Our Finance Manager #ChooseToChallenge Gender Inequality

This 𝗜𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿𝗻𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗹 𝗪𝗼𝗺𝗲𝗻’𝘀 𝗠𝗼𝗻𝘁𝗵, we asked some of our mission’s women leaders on what gender issue they #ChooseToChallenge, and how they use their voices to empower women around them.

Our Finance Manager, Ms. Jessa Marie Junco, chose to challenge gender inequality.

She further shares that, “gender equality has evolved through time, but not truly fixed. We must look towards the real involvement of women, at all levels and for every role as all universal values have nothing to do with gender. Without equality, our freedom is fragile and vulnerable.”

How about you, what do you #ChooseToChallenge?

In Celebration of International Women’s Day, Our HR Manager #ChooseToChallenge Gender Injustice

This 𝗜𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿𝗻𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗹 𝗪𝗼𝗺𝗲𝗻’𝘀 𝗠𝗼𝗻𝘁𝗵, we asked some of our mission’s women leaders on what gender issue they #ChooseToChallenge, and how they use their voices to empower women around them.

Our HR Manager, Ms. Juvilee Anne Ravanera, chose to challenge gender injustice in daily life and commits to reject sexist and racist attitude and consider ways to support the promotion of women in arts, sciences, sports, politics and other fields.

“As a leader, I help make the organization an inclusive place to work by hiring the best person available for every open position without having any assumptions or prejudices about it being a man or a woman’s job, train and compensate team members based on position and contribution regardless of gender, and implement policies that are fair enough, gender-sensitive and against any type of discrimination and harassment,” she shares.

How about you, what do you #ChooseToChallenge?

In Celebration of International Women’s Day, Our REACH Head of Project #ChooseToChallenge People’s Thoughts That Are Less Important Than What You Feel For Yourself

In celebration of 𝗜𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿𝗻𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗹 𝗪𝗼𝗺𝗲𝗻’𝘀 𝗗𝗮𝘆, we asked some of our mission’s women leaders on what gender issue they #ChooseToChallenge, and how they use their voices to empower women around them.

Our REACH Head of Project, Ms. Sitti Mhuriza Mamasalagat, chose to challenge people’s thoughts that are less important than what you feel for yourself. “We are unique, we are all different, but we are all equal,” she says.

Ms. Sitti commits to continue educating people that despite of our own differences, we should respect one another and give a chance, for we all have our great contribution to make a better society.

As a leader, she empowers both women and men of her team to be listened to, to trust their inner strength and self-instinct in decision-making. She adds that “by these opportunities, in their failure and success, they have learned and respected every teammate.”

Beneficiaries of Basic Shelter Kits In The Municipalities of Madamba, Kapai, Balindong, Saguiaran in Lanao Del Sur, and Pantao Ragaat, Lanao Del Norte Have Been Able to Repair Their Homes

Overtime, many of protractedly internally displaced persons (IDPs) in host-communities are living uncomfortably due to small spaces, some with less privacy and dilapidated shelters, and toilets outside their houses have no lighting especially at night.

Since November 2020, we have managed to provide basic shelter kits, sleeping and kitchen kits, and solar lamps to 600 hundred households in the municipalities of Madamba, Kapai, Balindong, Saguiaran in Lanao Del Sur, and Pantao Ragaat, Lanao Del Norte. The distributions were held in coordination with the local government for the deliveries and co-facilitating the activities.

Beneficiaries have since been able to repair their homes using the materials from the shelter kits.

This intervention is part of our 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗽𝗼𝗻𝘀𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗨𝗻𝗺𝗲𝘁 𝗛𝘂𝗺𝗮𝗻𝗶𝘁𝗮𝗿𝗶𝗮𝗻 𝗡𝗲𝗲𝗱𝘀 𝗼𝗳 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗠𝗼𝘀𝘁 𝗩𝘂𝗹𝗻𝗲𝗿𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲 𝗖𝗼𝗻𝗳𝗹𝗶𝗰𝘁-𝗔𝗳𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗣𝗼𝗽𝘂𝗹𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝗠𝗶𝗻𝗱𝗮𝗻𝗮𝗼’ (𝗥𝗘𝗔𝗖𝗛). The REACH project is funded by the EU Civil Protection & Humanitarian Aid – ECHO and is implemented together with CARE PhilippinesOxfam Pilipinas, and their local partners.

Alleviating Hunger and Malnutrition In Isolated Rural Areas, Urban Poor Communities, and Evacuation Camps by Tackling Its Root Cause

In 2019, our programs on nutrition & health have reached more than 8.8 million people in need all over the world.

In the Philippines, we specifically work in isolated rural areas, urban poor communities, and evacuation camps – alleviating hunger and malnutrition by tackling its root cause.

To find out more about our nutrition programs and how you can help, go to: 𝘄𝘄𝘄.𝗮𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻𝗮𝗴𝗮𝗶𝗻𝘀𝘁𝗵𝘂𝗻𝗴𝗲𝗿.𝗽𝗵

(Photo by Jasper Llanderal for Action Against Hunger)

Helping People Who Have Limited Access to Humanitarian Assistance is One of Our Priority

One of our priorities is providing necessary interventions to hard-to-reach communities who have limited access to humanitarian assistance.

With the support of our donors, our programs on nutrition & health; water, sanitation & hygiene; or food security and livelihood have helped countless of Filipinos throughout the years.

𝗬𝗼𝘂 𝘁𝗼𝗼 𝗰𝗮𝗻 𝗰𝗼𝗻𝘁𝗿𝗶𝗯𝘂𝘁𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗹𝗶𝗳𝗲-𝘀𝗮𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘄𝗼𝗿𝗸.
𝗠𝗮𝗸𝗲 𝗮 𝗱𝗼𝗻𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝘁𝗼𝗱𝗮𝘆.
https://actionagainsthunger.ph/call-for-donations-typhoon-…/

Tatay Carlos stands outside what used to be the barangay hall of Brgy. Guinsaanan and is now his temporary home after Typhoon Rolly destroyed his house

Story from the Field: Making Ends Meet

Sixty-seven year-old Carlos Tesorero had one word in mind when asked how he felt when he saw what was left of his home – painful. Carlos, or “Tatay Carlos” as they called him, had a house along the shore of Barangay Guinsaanan in the Municipality of Baras, Catanduanes.

On the morning of November 2, 2020, a day after Typhoon Rolly made landfall, he, along with the other families living near the sea, returned and saw that the typhoon’s strong winds and heavy rains had completely destroyed their houses. “After the storm had passed, at around eight in the morning we went back to check our houses and everything was gone… It was painful,” said Tatay Carlos. Hollow blocks, scraps of wood, metal, and scattered belongings were all that were left of their homes.

“After the storm had passed, at around eight in the morning we went back to check our houses and everything was gone… It was painful.”

The residents of Barangay Guinsaanan were no strangers to such weather conditions, especially for those residing along the shore.   In fact, in less than two weeks, the province had experienced the impacts of three typhoons – from Quinta to Rolly to Ulysses.  Amongst the three, it was Super Typhoon Rolly that greatly affected their homes and livelihoods.

Tatay Carlos worked as a tour guide since 2015. He would accompany tourists to Binurong Point, one of the top tourist destinations in the province and about an hour’s hike from his barangay. Back then, he would get two visitors in a normal week, earning him 200 to 300 pesos. During summers, there would be more tourists and he would get twice the amount of visitors. This all changed when the lockdown was implemented due to the COVID-19 pandemic. “I was were okay before.   But when the pandemic happened, it was hard because I had absolutely no income,” Tatay Carlos shares.

Tatay Carlos and his fellow tour guides looked for alternative sources of income. He went on to extract and sell dried coconut meat taro leaves, papayas or other crops, earning just enough to get by. Unfortunately, most of the crops and coconut trees were damaged after the consecutive typhoons. He then started to collect dried wood and would sell them for firewood. He would earn enough to buy his food for the day. Tatay Carlos said he tried to apply for manual labor jobs like construction, but was unsuccessful. “No one was accepting me because I was old, unlike the others,” he lamented. “I guess this is how it is when you get older, it’s more difficult to get a job.”

After the typhoons, the sea level had risen significantly, making the land where his home once stood into a ‘no-build’ zone. Like the other families who lived there, Tatay Carlos now has to start from scratch. Fortunately, he was allowed to reside in a small building which was previously used as a barangay hall for the meantime.

With all that he has been through, what saddens Tatay Carlos is going through these ordeals alone. His wife, daughter and grandchild visited a relative in Bulacan last year, but because of travel restrictions and financial constraints, they have not been able to return to Catanduanes since then. “If there was no pandemic, they would want to go back here,” he said. He tries to keep in contact with them regularly, but their conversations are often limited due to weak cellular phone reception.

In photo: Tatay Carlos happily smiles with his pet inside his temporary home.

After the typhoons, the sea level had risen significantly, making the land where his home once stood into a ‘no-build’ zone. Like the other families who lived there, Tatay Carlos now has to start from scratch. Fortunately, he was allowed to reside in a small building which was previously used as a barangay hall for the meantime.

With all that he has been through, what saddens Tatay Carlos is going through these ordeals alone. His wife, daughter and grandchild visited a relative in Bulacan last year, but because of travel restrictions and financial constraints, they have not been able to return to Catanduanes since then. “If there was no pandemic, they would want to go back here,” he said. He tries to keep in contact with them regularly, but their conversations are often limited due to weak cellular phone reception.

Despite living alone, he continues to be in good spirits by regularly talking to his neighbors. Tatay Carlos also enjoys the company of a white kitten which he keeps as a pet.  He spends his day by going to the sea to catch fish for his own consumption, since these are usually too small to sell. Some days, he checks if there are any crops to be harvested and sold. Tatay Carlos’ daily food is augmented by relief packs from various organizations.  Mineral water is sold in the barangay, but since he has no income, he would get drinking water from the deep well.

In photo: Inside Tatay Carlos’ temporary home, his beddings on one side and the relief goods he received on the other.

Tatay Carlos works hard each day in order to provide for himself and perhaps earn extra income to save. “What we really need is money,” he says with a weak laugh. “We received noodles and canned goods as relief, so food is all set. We got some soap too, but those ran out quickly. I have to admit, sometimes I loan items from the sari-sari store items like cooking oil or laundry soap, and I pay them back once I manage to sell some of the firewood I collect,” he adds further.

He was excited when he found out that he was selected to be a beneficiary for Action Against Hunger’s multipurpose cash assistance (MPCA). On January 27, Tatay Carlos was one of the 60 beneficiaries from Barangay Guinsaanan who received cash assistance amounting to 5,200 pesos. The MPCA was conducted as part of Action Against Hunger’s Emergency Assistance to Typhoon Affected Communities in Catanduanes and Albay, which is co-implemented by CARE Philippines. The project is made possible through the funding of the United States Agency for International Development’s Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance (USAID-BHA). The project is expected to reach a total of 14,500 people through MPCA alone. The goal of the program is to enable the most vulnerable households affected by Typhoon Rolly to meet immediate food and basic humanitarian needs.

“My number one dream is to have a house of our own again,”

With the assistance he received, Tatay Carlos remains hopeful and positive. “My number one dream is to have a house of my own again,” he shares. The makeshift house he is currently residing in is being sold at 30,000 pesos and he hopes to earn and save enough money so he can buy the lot someday. He also adds that  one of his priorities as well is to have his daughter graduate as this was his dream for himself when he was younger. “Even though she now has a child of her own, I want my daughter to finish her studies,” he says.

In photo: Tatay Carlos at the Multipurpose Cash Assistance (MPCA) payout orientation at Barangay Guinsaanan, Baras. (Photo by Joyce Sandajan for Action Against Hunger)

Despite losing both his home and livelihood, Tatay Carlos smiles as he shares the many ways he tries to make ends meet on a daily basis. Knowing he has to start from nothing pains him, but says he is thankful that there are people who are willing to extend kindness through various forms. He may have been through a lot the past year, but his family and the support from his community keeps him going.

404 Beneficiaries of Cash Assistance from #TyphoonRollyEmergencyResponse in Catanduanes

404 beneficiaries from Barangays Salvacion, Guinsaanan (Baras), and Cabcab (San Andres) received 5,200 pesos (107.19 USD) during the payout of our Multipurpose Cash Assistance (MPCA) last January 27 and 28, 2021. These beneficiaries came from the most vulnerable families which were severely affected by #TyphoonRolly (Goni) in Catanduanes.

Until now, thousands of affected families are barely back on their feet as the typhoons have impacted economic activities and living conditions. This is why one of the main identified needs is cash for food and other basic items.

Through our #TyphoonRollyEmergencyResponse, we are expecting to reach a total of 14,150 beneficiaries with MPCA in hopes of enabling them to meet their immediate food and basic humanitarian needs during these trying times.

With funding from the USAID’s Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance, this 𝗘𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗴𝗲𝗻𝗰𝘆 𝗔𝘀𝘀𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝗧𝘆𝗽𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗻 𝗔𝗳𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗖𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗲𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝗖𝗮𝘁𝗮𝗻𝗱𝘂𝗮𝗻𝗲𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗔𝗹𝗯𝗮𝘆 𝗣𝗿𝗼𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗰𝗲 is implemented by Action Against Hunger Philippines and CARE Philippines.

𝗙𝗶𝗻𝗱 𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝗺𝗼𝗿𝗲 𝗮𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝗼𝘂𝗿 𝗧𝘆𝗽𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗻 𝗥𝗼𝗹𝗹𝘆 𝗘𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗴𝗲𝗻𝗰𝘆 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗽𝗼𝗻𝘀𝗲:
https://actionagainsthunger.ph/super-typhoon-rolly-emergen…/

The Kits are a Big Help According to One of the 156 Household Who Received a Hygiene Kits Through our Typhoon Emergency Response

“The situation was really heavy for us, with COVID and then especially after the typhoons because we lost our house. We were worried about where to get money for our daily needs,” says Dominga Lora, whose family was one of the households in Barangay Danao, Baras, Catanduanes that were severely affected by #TyphoonRolly.

Her husband earns a living by fishing, while Dominga sells the fish, and sometimes gets laundry and cleaning jobs from neighbors. The consecutive typhoons damaged their home completely, but according to her, Typhoon Rolly made the biggest impact. Fortunately, with assistance from both the local government and financial support from their eldest child, they managed to rebuild their home little by little.

Not only that, the typhoon also affected the community’s water supply. For two weeks they had to get drinking water from the nearest creak which was a 30 minute to an hour’s walk from their area.

Aside from rebuilding their home, one of her concerns for the family is making sure their everyday supplies are sufficient, especially since she wants to make sure her family is safe from diseases like #COVID19.

“There are no COVID cases here in our area, but of course we take precaution because we never know who might be coming in and out of our barangay that may turn out to be sick. We wear masks and we are careful, especially now that there’s a new type of COVID,” she said. To address this, Dominga’s family was one of the 156 households in Danao who received hygiene kits last January 13, 2021 through our 𝗧𝘆𝗽𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗻 𝗥𝗼𝗹𝗹𝘆 𝗘𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗴𝗲𝗻𝗰𝘆 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗽𝗼𝗻𝘀𝗲.

“We’re grateful for the assistance that we received. Because of our situation, it’s hard to buy these items on our own so we will take care and use them for sure.” According to her, the kits are a big help for her four youngest children who regularly wash their hands.

The 𝗘𝗺𝗲𝗿𝗴𝗲𝗻𝗰𝘆 𝗔𝘀𝘀𝗶𝘀𝘁𝗮𝗻𝗰𝗲 𝘁𝗼 𝗧𝘆𝗽𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗻𝘀 𝗔𝗳𝗳𝗲𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗱 𝗖𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝗶𝗲𝘀 𝗶𝗻 𝗖𝗮𝘁𝗮𝗻𝗱𝘂𝗮𝗻𝗲𝘀 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝗔𝗹𝗯𝗮𝘆 𝗣𝗿𝗼𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗰𝗲 is funded by USAID’s Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance and is implemented by Action Against Hunger Philippines and CARE Philippines.